THE GARRETTS

THE LEISTON GARRETTS

The first of the Leiston Garretts, Richard (1755-1839) founded the works in 1778. He saw the importance of agricultural machinery and began to manufacture chaff cutters in addition to scythes and sickles. His son, Richard, (1779-1837) took over the business at the age of 26. He saw the potential of the newly-invented horse-powered threshing machine and under his leadership the Works grew to employ 60 men.

Amongst Richard II’s children were two powerful brothers, Richard and Newson. They and their families became highly influential forces in Leiston and Aldeburgh. Richard built up the Leiston engineering business to achieve national and international recognition; Newson expanded a malting business at Snape and built up much of Aldeburgh. Newson’s descendants, particularly his daughters, Elizabeth and Millicent, reached national significance.

Elizabeth Garrett wrote in 1864 ‘ My strength lies in the extra amount of daring which I have as a family endowment. All the Garretts have it.’

Richard Garrett I

[1755-1839]

Richard Garrett I

began working at his father’s forge in Woodbridge but came to Leiston in 1778 to join William Cracey as joint owner of a small forge of 8-10 men. Soon he was sole owner, where he made bladed farm implements along with general blacksmith work.

Elizabeth Newson

[1755-1839]

Elizabeth Newson

We don’t know why Richard Garrett did not inherit his father’s business in Woodbridge, which was left to his second son. It may be that he had fallen out with his father who was, reportedly, a difficult man but it might have been that he had fallen in love with Elizabeth Newson, a Leiston girl.

Richard

I

John

James

Abraham

Samuel

Jesse

Charles

Elizabeth

George

Harmon

Harmon

Richard Garrett II

[1779-1837]

Richard Garrett II

took over the forge in 1805. He began manufacturing vastly improved and efficient threshing machines, patented by John Ball [who later joined the business]. The success of the threshing machine exceeded all expectations; progress was rapid, and the firm began to prosper, with the workforce rising to about sixty.

Sarah Balls

[1776 - 1851]

Sarah Balls

was the daughter of a farmer in Hethersett.

Harriet

Richard

I

I

Balls

Sarah

Newson

(head of Aldeburgh Garretts)

Richard Garrett III

[1779-1837]

Richard Garrett III

gained sole control of the business in 1836. He was an ambitious innovator and entrepreneur. He started the manufacture of portable steam engines; built the Long Shop – for flow-line manufacturing; was a prominent exhibitor at agricultural shows; took his entire workforce to the Great Exhibition in London, of which he was a guarantor; fought for the bringing of the railway to Leiston.

Elizabeth Dunnell

[1806- 1884]

Elizabeth Dunnell

Elizabeth and Louisa were sisters who married the Garrett brothers, Richard and Newson. They were daughters of John Dunnell, from Dunwich who ran the Beehive Inn in London. One family member noted that 'both brothers attributed much of their success in life to the inspiration and support afforded them by their gifted and devoted wives' and another that 'both your mother and ours were very remarkable women'.

Richard

I

John

Betsy

Sarah

Ellen

Jane

Henry

Clara

Frank

I

Richard IV

[1829-1884]

Richard Garrett IV

became a joint partner with his brothers in the Leiston Works in 1853. Well respected in the world of agricultural engineering as a member of the Institution of Civil Engineers and of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, it was his developments of the threshing machine that kept Garretts at the forefront of agricultural machinery throughout the world.

Frank Garrett Snr

[1845-1918]

Frank Garrett Snr

was a partner with his brothers from 1853 but in 1884 became the sole owner. He continued the Garrett ground-breaking advancements and improvements in agricultural machinery, including introducing and extending the production of the corrugated firebox crown. Trade increased but market conditions meant profit margins were low. Russian debt during WW1 was disastrous and he was the last Garrett to run an exclusively family business.

Mary Anne Croft

[1844 -1897]

Mary Anne Croft

Usually known as May, Mary Anne was said to soften the cold side of Frank’s nature. When she died in 1897, Frank had a stained glass window installed in Leiston church - 12 female saints, all with her features.

Emma Barbara Stead

[1838-1916]

Emma Barbara Stead

Frank married Emma Barbara Stead in 1899 to help look after his large family. She was Mary Anne’s cousin; she died in 1916.

Frank Jnr.

I

Alfred

Stephen

I

Victor

Phyllis

Helen

Mary

Betty

Dorothy

Colonel Sir
Frank Garrett Jnr.

[1869-1952]

Colonel Sir Frank Garrett Jnr.

started at the Works in 1890 as works manager, later joining the board and becoming chairman, when it became a limited company. After witnessing the company’s insolvency in 1932, he devoted himself to public service. He was a Justice of the Peace, a member of the East Suffolk County Council, and chairman of the Leiston Urban District Council. He was knighted in 1946.

Stephen Garrett

[1878-1915]

Stephen Garrett

was educated at Rugby and Trinity, Cambridge. Considered the most progressive of the family, he was interested in the internal combustion engine and keen on the diesel tractor. He helped produce the Garrett Crawley Agrimotor in 1914. When war started he joined the 4th Suffolk Regiment as was killed in March 1915 at the battle of Neuve Chapelle.

THE ALDEBURGH GARRETTS

Newson Garrett

[1812-1893]

Newson Garrett

moved to London, becoming manager of a pawnbroker's shop in Whitechapel. On the death of his father and possibly on the advice of Richard he returned to Suffolk, bought the Fennell Corn and Coal Business at Snape Bridge and then the Bow Brewery in London. He began malting at Snape; designed and built the Snape Maltings and several properties in Aldeburgh. A great supporter of the Aldeburgh Lifeboat and a leading member of the town, he was elected Mayor in 1889. With Richard he brought the railway to the area.

Louisa Dunnell

[1813-1903]

Louisa Dunnell

Louisa and Elizabeth were sisters who married the Garrett brothers, Newson and Richard. They were daughters of John Dunnell, from Dunwich who ran the Beehive Inn in London. One family member noted that 'both brothers attributed much of their success in life to the inspiration and support afforded them by their gifted and devoted wives' and another that 'both your mother and ours were very remarkable women'.

Agnes Garrett

[1845 - 1935]

Agnes and Rhoda Garrett

Agnes and Rhoda her cousin (daughter of Rev John Fisher Garrett) were together at Blackheath School - Agnes a pupil; Rhoda a pupil teacher. 1871 they started training as architects in London and launched the firm of R & A Garrett in 1874. 1882 Rhoda died so Agnes continued alone. They were the first female interior designers.

Samuel Garrett

[1883-1949]

Samuel Garrett

was educated at Rugby School and Peterhouse, Cambridge before working as a solicitor with Parker & Co, Cornhill, London. 1917-18 he was President of the Law Society. He chaired a committee that worked on a bill allowing women to become solicitors. It became law in 1919. He was the first to accept women pupils in his office.

I

I

Louisa

Elizabeth

I

Dunnell

Newson

Edmund

Alice

Agnes

Millicent

I

Samuel

Josephine

George

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson

1838 – 1907

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson

was the first woman to gain a medical qualification in Britain. She was also the co-founder of the first hospital staffed by women, the first dean of a medical school, the first female doctor of medicine in France and as Mayor of Aldeburgh, the first female mayor and magistrate in Britain.
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James Skelton Anderson

[1836-1917]

James Skelton Anderson

son of a Scottish vicar, he became a shipping magnate, merging the family shipping business with Frederick Green & Co to create the Orient Steam Navigation Company. Moving to London he become financial adviser to the East London Hospital where he met Elizabeth Garrett, visiting physician at the hospital. Married in 1871 they had three children and retired to Aldeburgh in 1902 where he died of a stroke in 1907.

Millicent Garrett Fawcett

[1847-1929]

Millicent Garrett Fawcett

Aldeburgh born, Millicent Garrett Fawcett was a writer and campaigner for equal rights for women. As leader of the largest suffrage organisation, the non-violent NUWSS for 20 years, she played a key role in gaining women the vote. She also was a founder of Newnham College, Cambridge, one of the first English university colleges for women.
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Henry Fawcett

[1833-1884]

Henry Fawcett

became interested in politics at Cambridge and despite losing his sight at 25, became Professor of Political Economy. Involved in the fight to grant women the vote he met and married Millicent Garrett. She assisted him in his parliamentary work as MP for Hackney. As Postmaster Genera he introducing parcel post, postal orders and sixpenny telegrams and employed women as medical officers.

Louisa Garrett Anderson

[1873 - 1943]

Louisa Garrett Anderson

trained as a doctor 1892-1900. 1912 involved in suffrage activities, she spent 4 weeks in Holloway Prison but also started the Women’s Hospital for Children with her colleague, Flora Murray. In WW1 they ran two hospitals in France and one in London. 1914-1921 they worked at the Children’s Hospital. During WW2 Louisa was on the staff of the Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Hospital.

Sir Alan Garrett Anderson

[1877 - 1952]

Sir Alan Garrett Anderson

joined his father’s shipping enterprise, later expanding into rail transport. During WW1 through his connections with shipping he became Controller of the Admiralty. After the war he became a director, then deputy governor, of the Bank of England. He was MP for the City of London 1935 -1940 until his knowledge of transport led to his appointment as Controller of Railways.

Philippa Garrett Fawcett

[1868-1948]

Philippa Garrett Fawcett

an only child, she went to Newnham College, Cambridge to study mathematics and was placed ‘above the Senior Wrangler’ (the undergraduate with the highest examination marks). As a woman she was not allowed to be named as Senior Wrangler unlike her cousin, Philip Cowell, another of Newson’s grandchildren, who also studied mathematics at Cambridge. Philippa was Director of Education for London County Council 1905-1934.

The river Alde at Snape Maltings

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