MACHINES
TRANSFORM
FARMING

Machines Transform Farming

This poster from 1839 illustrated the range of Garrett farm machines. A seed drill can be seen in the centre.

You can see examples of these machines around the museum.

Garrett machines transformed work on the farm. During the 1800s, work by hand was replaced by machinery that speeded up many farming jobs.

Garretts were famous for threshing machines, mechanical hoes and seed drills. New machines also speeded up other essential tasks around the farm such as chaff cutting (for animal food) and wood clearing and sawing.

This poster from 1839 illustrated the range of Garrett farm machines. A seed drill can be seen in the centre.

You can see examples of these machines around the museum.

The gallery of the Long Shop is used today for display.

The gallery of the Long Shop
is used today for display.

Seed drills and hoes

These machines were first horse-drawn and later steam powered. In a fraction of the time men had taken to deal with one row at a time, new machines could be used to sow seeds in several rows and then keep the planted rows free from weeds.

An advertisement for a horse-drawn
seed drill. This photograph was actually taken
on the outskirts of Leiston – though Garrett products
were exported for use in Europe and worldwide.

An advertisement for a horse-drawn seed drill. This photograph was actually taken on the outskirts of Leiston – though Garrett products were exported for use in Europe and worldwide.

Steam-power threshing machines from the Garrett illustrated catalogues 1851-64

Threshing Machines

Threshing machines replaced the labour-intensive work that was needed to separate the grain from the chaff and straw by hand. Garretts sold thousands of them.

Steam-power threshing machines from the Garrett illustrated catalogues 1851-64

The Suffolk Garland reported In 1865,

‘Nearly 2000 threshing machines have been made at the Leiston Works during the last sixteen years.

It was the success of the threshing machines that allowed the firm to grow rapidly in the first half of the nineteenth century. In fifteen years from 1836 the firm’s workforce grew from 60 to 324.

This medal, won by Garretts, shows a farming scene with machinery powered by a portable steam engine in the mid-nineteenth century.

From 'Bell's Weekly Messenger and Farmers’ Journal' July 13, 1863,

In 1806 Mr. Garrett ventured upon the then dangerous undertaking of making a thrashing machine, which was patented by Mr. John Ball, Hetheringsett, near Norwich, the first of its kind that was effectively applied to thrashing grain in England. This was a bold adventure, but it established the reputation of Mr. Garrett in the country. This thrashing machine, in time, though introduced through a strong opposition, and much clamour, laid the basis of the large manufactory which we are now about to describe, and was the progenitor of the majority of thrashing machines now in practical operation.

Hear what was published in 'Bell's Weekly Messenger and Farmers’ Journal' on July 13, 1863

Hear what was published in 'Bell's Weekly Messenger and Farmers’ Journal' on July 13, 1863

Click Here

See the farming
machines at work

International Success for Garrett Machines

After the huge success at the Great Exhibition of 1851, Garrett farm machinery continued to collect medals in international exhibitions throughout the years before the First World War.

© The Long Shop Museum 2019

The Long Shop Museum is a charity registered with the Charity Commission for England and Wales.

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